Barn Owl season begins…

January 31st, 2015

There is one bird of prey that is an instant favourite. The Barn Owl.

It is a privilege and pleasure to see these birds at any time of the year. Over the last twelve months I have found a number of birds locally. Some are very much night hunters and I never see them during the day. Others are a little more confident and will occasionally put in an appearance when the sun is still shining. I have found them to be very difficult to predict. Their patterns of behaviour change almost daily which results in many “wasted” hours hoping for a glimpse of this elegant bird.

When one does come out during the day and hunts within “photographic” range, then all of that “wasted” time becomes irrelevant.


Testing a Canon 7D MK2 on Kestrels…

November 30th, 2014

Canon recently released the Canon 7D MK2 camera, aimed squarely at wildlife and sports photographers. A few days after it started to arrive in the UK stores, this new DSLR was firmly in my hands.

I use a full frame Canon 1DX for nearly all of my photographs these days. That camera consistently gives me high quality images time after time. However, being full frame, there are times when I wish that my camera and lens combination had a little more “reach”. Therefore, the 1.6 crop factor offered by the Canon 7D MK2 was the prime reason why I added this camera body to my kit bag. Sometimes, when I am photographing small birds for example, the birds can still be a little too small in the frame on my 1DX camera. Having some extra “reach” is also advantageous when photographing larger but more “nervous” species. Birds like this Kestrel have a natural comfort zone, and it doesn’t like coming too close to my hide. By connecting the 1.6 crop camera to my lens it allows me to place the hide much further away from the bird, allowing the Kestrel to be more relaxed.


RSPB Love Nature magazine, “Photo of the Issue”

October 31st, 2014

I am delighted to see my image of a Great Crested Grebe in the latest issue of RSPBs Love Nature magazine.

The RSPB often print readers images in their magazine but this particular image was selected as their “Photo of the Issue”. Apart from the obvious personal recognition, the prize that they awarded was very suitable indeed. More than 500 pounds of outdoor weather clothing including boots from Blacks in the UK.

I would like to say a great big thank you to the RSPB for selecting my image and to Blacks for sponsoring the “Photo of the Issue” prize.


British Wildlife Photography Awards BWPA – Highly Commended Kestrel

September 28th, 2014

I am a little bit late in communicating this news given my travels over the last few weeks…


However, I am delighted to announce that this image of a Kestrel was Highly Commended at this years British Wildlife Photography Awards (BWPA) in the Animal Portraits section.
The awards ceremony for the BWPA was hosted by Chris Packham on 3rd September 2014 in London. Given that I was photographing in Kenya that week I was unable to attend the awards ceremony. It was a shame that I was unable to visit in person so I will take this opportunity to congratulate all of the winners and all those who had work commended and thank the organisers for their effort and time to organise these annual awards.

Earlier in the year I had decided not to enter any of the major photographic competitions. That decision was partly due to work commitments at the time and partly to take a step away from the competitive edge of photography and concentrate on what I enjoy doing most, namely taking photographs. Well, all of that changed when a certain friend and inspirational photographer Richard Peters visited for the weekend and “put some pressure” on me to enter. The deadline for the BWPA entry coincided with Richards visit, so to keep my guest happy, I duly entered…

Thanks therefore go to for the nudge. Cheers buddy…

A Little Owlet landing…

August 26th, 2014

Here is one from this years session with the Little Owls.

The Little Owls started nesting quite early this year, so when the breeding season began I thought that two broods could be a real possibility. The weather was nice and warm when the Owlets finally hatched, so again I thought that they would be anxious to leave the barn and get out into the fresh and cooler air. How wrong I was. This years Owlets spent weeks and weeks in the nest and when they did finally appear they were already pretty big ( relatively speaking!) . They were however very fluffy and instantly recognisable as Owlets.

Here is one of the Owlets when it was still not sure when to run, fly, walk or hop…

Owlet Landing